Summer Outings Sharing Time and "Another Open Space Lost - ?" Presentation Planned for September 24

El Paso Group Chair Laurence Gibson invites all to the Singapore Cafe Wednesday, September 24 at 6pm for dinner on your own and a 7pm program of summer outings pictures. Carol Miller will make a short presentation called "Another Open Space Lost - ?" and will be bringing maps and handouts including petitions.

Another Open Space Lost - ?
by Carol Miller


Sierra Club Rio Grande Chapter PAC Fundraiser

Featuring special guest U.S. Rep. Ben Ray Luján
Enjoy wine, hors d’oeuvres and the beautiful view!

5-7 p.m. Friday, Sept. 12
Home of Judy Williams and Elliot Stern
Suggested contribution: $50 per person
RSVP: smartin31@comcast.net, 505-670-3279

Hosts:
David Coss
Susan and Richard Martin
Norma McCallan

The Rio Grande Chapter PAC has a stellar track record at getting pro-environment candidates elected using grassroots strategizing and its unparalleled volunteer power.

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Election boot camp with Commissioner Holian and former Mayor Coss: How to help good candidates win!

Do you want to make a difference this November by helping elect candidates who will make New Mexico a better place for us all?

This two-and-a-half-hour training will teach you best tactics for winning elections.

We'll hear from Santa Fe County Commissioner Kathy Holian and former Mayor David Coss, veteran campaign managers and practiced canvassers. We'll discuss the latest data on what really turns voters out. And we'll have a chance to practice these techniques to prepare you to be an effective campaigner this fall.

WHEN: 6 to 8:30 p.m. Thursday, Sept. 11


Take Action: NM Game Commission may try to stop federal wolf reintroduction

Wolf3

The cancelled Aug. 21 New Mexico Game Commission meeting has been rescheduled but they are still planning to discuss and may vote on a rule change that could threaten the recovery of endangered Mexican wolves.

The proposal would give the state Game Commission excessive authority to approve any application for the possession, use, release or importation of wolves or any predatory animals for the purpose of recovery, reintroduction, conditioning, establishment or reestablishment in New Mexico.

The rescheduled Game Commission meeting:


El Paso Group Endorses Franklin Mountains Conservation Petition Calling for Saving Land on Both Sides of the Franklin Mountains

Map of City Owned Land Included in Petition

The Sierra Club El Paso Group has endorsed the Franklin Mountains Conservation Petition calling for Saving land on both sides of the Franklin Mountains. The petition asks the El Paso City Council to pass the following ordinance:


A membership moment – please take a minute to consider your Sierra Club membership

Takota, a Golden Eagle from the El Paso Zoo at the Chihuahuan Desert Fiesta in 2010 by Rick LoBello

I have always admired and respected the Sierra Club. When I worked in the national parks we all heard the story of John Muir and I can really relate to what he said in The Yosemite in 1912… "Everybody needs beauty as well as bread, places to play in and pray in, where nature may heal and give strength to body and soul alike."


Be a voice for Mexican wolves

Wolf1 © 2006 Larry Allen

July 15, 2014
Wolves need you to speak out at public hearings to save them from extinction.

The Fish and Wildlife Service will soon be releasing the Draft Environmental Impact statement for new rule changes that will determine the future of our Lobos. There are only 83 wolves in the wild in New Mexico and Arizona, and the proposed rules will likely have provisions that make it easier to kill them and dim their chances for recovery. There should be some good provisions too that need to be supported.


How to help wildlife through the human zone

This bobcat kitten was brought to the Wildlife Center from a backyard.

By Katherine Eagleson, Wildlife Center, Española, 06/30/14

In the United States we have done a pretty good job of saving scenic places. A lot of wildlife lives in those places.

But when a drought lingers year after year and depletes food sources, or a wildfire burns the habitat to dirt, or maybe it’s just time for the youngsters to move out, make a life of their own, spread the gene pool, how do we accommodate wild animals’ need to move?

Badly, that’s how we have done it so far. We have not planned well to give wildlife the corridors they need to move safely between habitats. We have also misled the public by giving the impression that wildlife managers can collect wildlife from backyards and parks and homeowners’ association properties and transport them to some wilderness nirvana.


PNM Plans to Waste Tens of Billions of Gallons of Water by Burning Fossil Fuels

For Immediate Release: June 25, 2014
Contact: Jim Mackenzie -350 New Mexico, 505 350-6000
    David Robertson, Sierra Club – Rio Grande Chapter, 505-803-6242

Albuquerque, NM --- The Public Service Company of New Mexico (PNM) is squandering a chance to save tens of billions of gallons of water through the year 2033 by investing in large-scale, cost-effective renewable energy. PNM is instead planning to use mostly nuclear, coal, and natural gas, all highly water intensive, to replace the power from two soon to be shuttered stacks at the San Juan Generating Stations in northwestern New Mexico. The Rio Grande Chapter of the Sierra Club and 350 New Mexico issued its “PNM Water You Thinking Report” today detailing PNM's plan to unnecessarily consume large amounts of water in power production, which the utility described in their December filing to the Public Regulation Commission (PRC).


Sierra Club Rio Grande Chapter applauds plan to curb carbon pollution

Coal - San Juan

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE: June 2, 2014
Contact: Camilla Feibelman, 505.715.8388

Albuquerque, NM -- Today, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency issued a proposal for the first-ever national protections from dangerous carbon pollution from existing power plants. Carbon pollution causes climate disruption and is already costing American communities billions of dollars from flooding, super-storms, wildfires, and extreme heat.


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